Mumbai University Distance Education Programme De-Recognised By UGC

Mumbai University Distance Education Programme De-Recognised By UGC

Mumbai University Distance Education Programme De-Recognised By UGC

New Delhi: 

Several students who enrolled into distance education programme offered by the Institute of Distance and Open Learning (IDOL) of the University of Mumbai have been sent in a lurch. The distance programme offered by University of Mumbai is no longer recognized by UGC. The Distance Education Bureau, UGC released the list of approved Distance Education Institutes and their corresponding courses for the academic year 2018-19 on October 3 this year.

By the time the list was released, several Open Universities and Distance Education departments had completed the admission process. Students who have taken admission into such programmes and institutes which are no longer recognized by UGC are now in a fix.

How To Ensure You Are Enrolled In A Recognised Distance Learning Course

As reported by Mumbai Mirror, the Mumbai University Distance Education Programme lost its recognition because of the University’s lack of a NAAC grade. As reported by Mumbai Mirror, the University had completed admission process to the distance education courses on October 30, which poses the question as to why the University went ahead with the admission process when UGC had de-recognized its distance programmes.

Is Your Open And Distance Programme Fake? Check UGC Recognised University List Here

It’s not just IDOL, Mumbai University that has lost its recognition. As opposed to 118 Open Schools and Universities that were recognized by UGC in the list released in 2017, there are only 75 universities in the list released in 2018.

There is no word form UGC yet about the plight of these students and what steps could be taken to rectify the mistake and not allow one academic year to go into waste for these students.

[“source=ndtv”]

Mumbai University Distance Education Programme De-Recognised By UGC

Mumbai University Distance Education Programme De-Recognised By UGC

Mumbai University Distance Education Programme De-Recognised By UGC

New Delhi: Several students who enrolled into distance education programme offered by the Institute of Distance and Open Learning (IDOL) of the University of Mumbai have been sent in a lurch. The distance programme offered by University of Mumbai is no longer recognized by UGC. The Distance Education Bureau, UGC released the list of approved Distance Education Institutes and their corresponding courses for the academic year 2018-19 on October 3 this year.

By the time the list was released, several Open Universities and Distance Education departments had completed the admission process. Students who have taken admission into such programmes and institutes which are no longer recognized by UGC are now in a fix.

How To Ensure You Are Enrolled In A Recognised Distance Learning Course

As reported by Mumbai Mirror, the Mumbai University Distance Education Programme lost its recognition because of the University’s lack of a NAAC grade. As reported by Mumbai Mirror, the University had completed admission process to the distance education courses on October 30, which poses the question as to why the University went ahead with the admission process when UGC had de-recognized its distance programmes.

Is Your Open And Distance Programme Fake? Check UGC Recognised University List Here

It’s not just IDOL, Mumbai University that has lost its recognition. As opposed to 118 Open Schools and Universities that were recognized by UGC in the list released in 2017, there are only 75 universities in the list released in 2018.

There is no word form UGC yet about the plight of these students and what steps could be taken to rectify the mistake and not allow one academic year to go into waste for these students.

[“source=gsmarena”]

Top 5 must-knows for education loan tax deduction

Gaurav Aggarwal

Education plays a crucial role in the economic development of all societies. While there is a universal acknowledgement to the need for public funding of primary and secondary education, public funding of higher education in a developing country like India is not feasible.

Thus, recognising the importance of higher education and the role of institutional funding to deal with rising cost of higher education, the policymakers came out with tax deduction on education loans under Section 80E.

The objective was to relieve interest burden from education loan borrowers through tax incentives. However, to claim the tax deduction, the borrowers have to meet certain conditions.

Here is a list of ‘must-knows’ regarding tax deduction on education loans:

Principal component does not qualify for tax deduction:

Borrowers often misunderstand tax exemption provisions available on education loan. This stems from tax exemptions available on home loan where both principal and interest components of EMIs qualify for tax deductions under Section 80C and 24b, respectively.

[“source=marketingweek]

EDUCATION NEWS AROUND IDAHO

IDAHO STUDENTS INVITED TO SUBMIT ART HOLIDAY CARDS

The Idaho State Department of Education is now accepting holiday card contest submissions from Idaho students in grades K-6.

Winning entries from each grade level will be published on the State Department of Education website, and one drawing will be selected for use as the department’s official holiday card. The artist who submits the winning design will receive cards for personal use. For a look at past winners and contest guidelines, click here.

Drawings should be on 8.5 x 11-inch paper in a landscape format and must be labeled on the back with the student’s name, grade, district, school, school district and teacher’s name.  Students are encouraged to completely fill the page but keep the design simple, using as many colors as they want. Students may use watercolors, colored paper, magic markers, crayons or a combination of those items.

The deadline for submitting artwork is Friday, Nov. 2. Entries should be mailed to Idaho State Department of Education, Holiday Card Contest, attn.: Rachelle Armstrong, P.O. Box 83720 Boise 83720-0027.

MEET NEW YORK TIMES CHAIRMAN ARTHUR SULZBERGER JR.

Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr., publisher of The New York Times from 1992-2017, will discuss the current state of American media, culture and politics at a free public event at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26, at the Taco Bell Arena on the campus of Boise State University.

Sulzberger’s talk will be moderated by former Boise State University President Bob Kustra, host of Reader’s Corner on Boise State Public Radio, and feature questions from Boise State University students, faculty and the greater Boise community.

Sulzberger’s public appearance is part of a two-day visit to Boise State University with Walter Robb, a mentor, investor and advisor to food companies and their CEOs. Robb is the former co-CEO of Whole Foods Market and a Professor of the Practice at Boise State University. The two longtime business leaders will meet with students, faculty and others during their visit to campus.

Sulzberger led The Times for 25 years, during which time he presided over the digital and international expansion of the news organization. Today, The Times has more readers and subscribers than at any point in its 167-year history, with an average monthly audience of more than 130 million people and 3.5 million paid subscriptions. Under his leadership, The Times won 61 Pulitzer Prizes, doubling the paper’s total Pulitzer count.

His journalism career began at The Raleigh, N.C., Times in 1974. He moved to the Associated Press London bureau two years later. He joined The Times, the newspaper his family has controlled since 1896, as a correspondent in the Washington bureau in 1978.

Sulzberger remains the chairman of the board of The New York Times Company. His son A.G. Sulzberger succeeded him as publisher.

WANT A FREE BEER?

Idaho Association for the Education of Young Children is launching a new project called Preschool the Idaho Way. The project is aimed to developing high-quality, affordable preschool opportunities for Idaho families by equipping Idahoans with the tools and resources they need to create local solutions.

You can attend the launch party on Wednesday, Oct 10 from 5-7 p.m. at Lost Grove Brewing in Boise. The event is free and open to all ages.
[“source=timesofindia”]

Ministers can’t ignore the coming higher education debt crisis

Students at Cardiff University

Cardiff University borrowed £300m at 3% over 40 years but ran a surplus of just £145,000 in the year to July 2017.

It should be one of the bright spots in the British economy, one that shines through the Brexit gloom, but the higher education sector has become a pin on which balances the most enormous mountain of debt.

And with speculation that institutions may be in financial trouble circulating around the sector, ministers are nervous.

Recent figures show that UK universities have borrowed £12bn since the financial crash – from their banks, from private investors, mostly in the US, and from the international bond markets.

Oxford borrowed £750m over 100 years at an interest rate of 2.5% and is seen as a safe bet. Cardiff was not far behind, borrowing £300m at 3% over 40 years. However, the Welsh institution ran a surplus of just £145,000 in the year to July 2017. At this rate, when the loan ends and the capital must be repaid, “it would take over 2,000 years to pay off the debt”, the IFR reported.

This colossal and rising total of university borrowing is dwarfed by projections for a rise in student debt from the current £100bn to £1tn over the next 25 years and the hundreds of millions borrowed to build student accommodation.

Not only is there a mountain of debt reliant on the success of the sector: universities generate £95bn for the economy and £12.5bn of exports. Towns and cities in Britain with a university or two derive huge benefits from the economic activity they generate. Council leaders fall over themselves to please their local vice-chancellors. With so much at stake, anyone would think that ministers would follow suit.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t seem to be the case. While there are MPs and officials in Whitehall who understand how crucial higher education has become to the finances and fabric that underpin the British economy, the cabinet continues to procrastinate about two crucial issues – reforms of the student fees system and the treatment of foreign students by the Home Office.

The prime minister has set in train a review of post-18 technical education, which is a much neglected subject, but does little to address the difficulties faced by more academically focused universities.

Many of them, especially the second tier and below, are left in a tricky position. Most have already cut costs by driving their academic and ancillary staff onto precarious short-term and zero-hours contracts.

Then there is the number of 18-year-olds, which is falling. So is the number of foreign students.

Oxford and Cambridge will attract students from abroad who are prepared to jump through the Home Office’s hoops. But the less-well-known colleges, and even the Russell Group universities, are already losing out.

Loans deals, many of which were signed in the euphoria following 2012 – when colleges, suddenly awash with student loan cash, made a dash for growth – add another layer of cost. Unfortunately, debts that were once deemed affordable might not be in the next few years as annual budgets come under strain.

Last week, Sir Michael Barber, the head of the university regulator, the Office for Students (OFS), insisted the government would let higher education institutions in financial trouble go to the wall.

Barber, a former Institute of Education professor, former Labour government adviser, ex-head of McKinsey’s global education practice and chair of the OFS, knows his stuff, but those who lend serious amounts of money to the UK education sector seem to think otherwise.

Moody’s, the credit ratings agency, has built into its analysis the assumption that university loans are gilt-edged – that is to say that lending to a university is as good as lending to the government. This contradiction can be explained by the existence of a divide between the top tier of universities, which are probably safe with or without a government guarantee, and the rest, which could be let go – but with consequences not just for the debt holders. Local communities would suffer and, more broadly, the nation would see a star industry founder.

Andrew McGettigan, author of The Great University Gamble, warned in 2012 that George Osborne and David Willetts, the chancellor and higher education minister respectively, risked killing a golden goose by loading it up with debt.

Today it is even clearer that ministers, should they sit on their hands, will push the system further into the red and weaker institutions closer to collapse.

… three years ago, we knew we had to try to make The Guardian sustainable by deepening our relationship with our readers. The revenues from our newspaper had diminished and the technologies that connected us with a global audience had moved advertising money away from news organisations. We knew we needed to find a way to keep our journalism open and accessible to everyone, regardless of where they live or what they can afford.

And so, we have an update for you on some good news. Thanks to all the readers who have supported our independent, investigative journalism through contributions, membership or subscriptions, we are starting to overcome the urgent financial situation we were faced with. Today we have been supported by more than a million readers around the world. Our future is starting to look brighter. But we have to maintain and build on that level of support for every year to come, which means we still need to ask for your help.

Ongoing financial support from our readers means we can continue pursuing difficult stories in the challenging times we are living through, when factual reporting has never been more critical. The Guardian is editorially independent – our journalism is free from commercial bias and not influenced by billionaire owners, politicians or shareholders. This is important because it enables us to challenge the powerful and hold them to account. With your support, we can continue bringing The Guardian’s independent journalism to the world.

If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, enjoys it, helps to support it, our future would be so much more secure.

[“source=forbes]

Funding to Increase Access to Education, Workforce Training and Health Care Opportunities in Rural Communities

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that USDA is awarding grants for 128 projects to increase access to job training (PDF, 351 KB), healtheducational and health care services in rural areas.

“Empowering rural Americans with access to services for quality of life and economic development is critical to rural prosperity,” Secretary Perdue said. “Distance learning and telemedicine technology bridges the gap that often exists between rural communities and essential education, workforce training and health care resources.”

USDA is awarding $39.6 million through the Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) Grant Program. More than 4.5 million residents in 40 states and three territories will benefit from the funding.

Below are summaries of some of USDA’s investments in rural communities:

  • Washburn University, in Kansas, is being awarded $349,213 to help provide resources to enable two-way interactive distance learning via video teleconferencing technology. The technology will help develop workplace skills that are increasingly needed in the modern, technical work environment. The resources provided through this investment will enable rural students across Kansas to obtain these skills. Additionally, this investment will be used to recruit and retain health care workers for rural communities. More than 3,700 students will have access to the educational opportunities provided with this project, including students in a high school in the Lawrence-Gardener Juvenile Corrections Center.
  • St. Anthony Hospital, in Oklahoma, is receiving $457,020 to help SSM Health Care of Oklahoma purchase telemedicine equipment to expand its Saints 1st Telehealth Network to serve up to 3,434 inpatients and 3,401 outpatients. This project will reduce time and expense for patients to access specialized medical services such as cardiology, endocrinology, pulmonology, ENT (ear, nose and throat), pediatric, hospitalist, primary care, and mental health care. Telemedicine links will be established at 12 hub/end-user locations in Beaver, Blaine, Custer, Garvin, Harper, Kiowa, Lincoln, Major, McClain, Washita and Woods counties. Project sites include nine rural hospitals and three rural physician practices. This project will significantly improve health care in the affected areas.

In April 2017, President Donald J. Trump established the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity to identify legislative, regulatory and policy changes that could promote agriculture and prosperity in rural communities. In January 2018, Secretary Perdue presented the Task Force’s findings to President Trump. These findings included 31 recommendations to align the federal government with state, local and tribal governments to take advantage of opportunities that exist in rural America. Increasing investments in rural infrastructure is a key recommendation of the task force.

To view the report in its entirety, please view the Report to the President of the United States from the Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity (PDF, 5.4 MB). In addition, to view the categories of the recommendations, please view the Rural Prosperity infographic (PDF, 190 KB).

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov.

[“source=forbes]