Is Your Open And Distance Programme Fake? Check UGC Recognised University List Here

Is Your Open And Distance Programme Fake? Check UGC Recognised University List Here

Several students who enrolled into distance education programmes offered by the Institute of Distance and Open Learning (IDOL) of the University of Mumbai woke upto the news recently that their Institute no longer has the required recognition from the UGC, official government body responsible for the Open and Distance programmes run in the country. University Grants Commission (UGC)’s Distance Education Bureau on October 3, 2018 released a list of Higher Education Institutions or universities in India recognized by the commission for academic year 2018-19 and onwards to conduct programmes through the Open and Distance Learning Mode.

How To Ensure You Are Enrolled In A Recognised Distance Learning Course

According to the list published by the UGC the some universities have their recognition to run the Open and Distance programmes till 2019-20 academic year, while some are allowed to run their courses till 2022-2023.

(Click here to know which courses are recognised by UGC)

Complete UGC Recognised University List

Check the complete list UGC recognised HEIs here (state-wise as on October 3, 2018):

ANDHRA PRADESH

1. ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

2. SRI PADMAVATI MAHILA VISHWAVIDYALAYAM (STATE UNIVERSITY)

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

3. RAJIV GANDHI UNIVERSITY

ASSAM

4. ASSAM DON BOSCO UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

5. KRISHNA KANTA HANDIQUE STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

6. GAUHATI UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

7. DIBRUGARH UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

8. TEZPUR UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

BIHAR

9. LALIT NARAYAN MITHILA UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

10. NALANDA OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

CHANDIGARH

11. PANJAB UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

UGC Urges Universities To Submit Social Science Research Proposal To IMPRESS

CHHATTISGARH

12. PT. SUNDARLAL SHARMA OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

13. C.V.RAMAN UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

DELHI

14. INDIRA GANDHI NATIONAL OPEN UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

15. UNIVERSITY OF DELHI (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

16. RASHTRIYA SANSKRIT SANSTHAN (DEEMED TO BE UNIVERSITY)

GUJARAT

17. DR. BABASAHEB AMBEDKAR OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

HARYANA

18. CHAUDHARY DEVI LAL UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

19. MAHARISHI DAYANAND UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

20. GURU JAMBESHWAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

KARNATAKA

21. KARNATAKA STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

22. MANGALORE UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

23. BANGALORE UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

24. KUVEMPU UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

25. MYSORE UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

26. JAIN UNIVERSITY (DEEMED TO BE UNIVERSITY)

New Approval Body For Journals In Social Sciences, Humanities: UGC

KERALA

27. UNIVERSITY OF KERALA (STATE UNIVERSITY)

28. CALICUT UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

29. KANNUR UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

MAHARASHTRA

30. MAHATMA GANDHI ANTARRASHTRIYA HINDI VISHWAVIDYALAYA (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

31. SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

32. YASHWANTRAO CHAVAN MAHARASHTRA OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

33. SMT. NATHIBAI DAMODAR THACKERSEY WOMENS UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

MADHYA PRADESH

34. BARKATULLAH UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

35. M.P.BHOJ (OPEN) UNIVERSITY

36. MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI VEDIC VISHWAVIDYALAYA (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

37. DEVI AHILYA VISHWAVIDYALAYA (STATE UNIVERSITY)

38. M.G. CHITRAKOOT VISHWAVIDYALAYA (STATE UNIVERSITY)

ODISHA

39. FAKIR MOHAN UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

40. NORTH ORISSA UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

41. ORISSA STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

PUNJAB

42. PUNJABI UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

43. LOVELY PROFESSIONAL UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

PONDICHERRY

44. PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

RAJASTHAN

45. JAIPUR NATIONAL UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

46. SURESH GYAN VIHAR UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

47. JAGAN NATH UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

48. VARDHMAN MAHAVEER OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

49. JAYOTI VIDYAPEETH WOMEN’S UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

TAMIL NADU

50. UNIVERSITY OF MADRAS (STATE UNIVERSITY)

51. ANNA UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

52. TAMIL NADU OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

53. TAMIL UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

54. SRM INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (DEEMED TO BE UNIVERSITY)

TRIPURA

55. INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED FINANCIAL ANALYSTS OF INDIA, AGARTALA (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

56. TRIPURA UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

TELANGANA

57. KAKATIYA UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

58. MAULANA AZAD NATIONAL URDU UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

59. DR. B.R. AMBEDKER OPEN UNIVERSITY, HYDERABAD (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

60. THE ENGLISH AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

UTTARAKHAND

61. UTTARAKHAND OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

62. UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND ENERGY STUDIES (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

UTTAR PRADESH

63. ALIGARH MUSLIM UNIVERSITY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY)

64. INTEGRAL UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

65. U.P. RAJARSHI TANDON OPEN UNIVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

66. SWAMI VIVEKANAND SUBHARTI UNIVERSITY (PRIVATE UNIVERSITY)

WEST BENGAL

67. BURDWAN UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

68. NETAJI SUBHASH OPEN UNVERSITY (STATE OPEN UNIVERSITY)

69. VIDYASAGAR UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

70. UNIVERSITY OF KALYANI (STATE UNIVERSITY)

71. RABINDRA BHARATI UNIVERSITY (STATE UNIVERSITY)

OTHERS

72. JAGADGURU SHRI SHIVARATHREESW ARA UNIVERSITY (KARNATAKA)

73. JAIN VISHWA BHARATI INSTITUTE (RAJASTHAN)

74. DAYALBAGH EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE (UTTAR PRADESH)

75. PADMASHREE DR. D.Y. PATIL VIDYAPEETH, MUMBAI (MAHARASHTRA)

[“source=cnbc”]

Is Uber a Taxi Company or Not? The EU’s Top Court Will Decide

Photographer: Akos Stiller/Bloomberg

Uber Technologies Inc. is set to reach the end of the road in a legal battle over a question that’s reached the European Union’s top court — is the world’s most valuable startup a taxi company or not?

Uber has argued that it’s a technology platform connecting passengers with independent drivers, not a transportation company subject to the same rules as taxi services. The decision is being closely watched by the technology industry because it could set a precedent for how firms in the burgeoning gig economy are regulated across the 28-nation bloc.

“The judgment will either promote the digital single market or lead to more market fragmentation for online innovators,” said Jakob Kucharczyk, of the Computer & Communications Industry Association, which speaks for companies like Uber, Amazon.com Inc., Google and Facebook Inc. “The court should make a clear distinction between the online intermediation and the underlying service it facilitates.”

The case centers around UberPop, an inexpensive ride-hailing service in several European cities that allowed drivers without a taxi license to use their own cars to pick up passengers. Legal challenges have forced Uber to shutter its UberPop services in most major European countries in favor of UberX, which requires drivers to get a license.

A loss for Uber would mean countries in the EU will have to classify Uber as a transportation service. While Uber adheres to many taxi laws in countries where it operates, the case could lead to new regulations and fees.

“Any ruling will not change things in most EU countries where we already operate under transportation law,” Uber said in a statement. “However, millions of Europeans are still prevented from using apps like ours. As our new CEO has said, it is appropriate to regulate services such as Uber. We want to partner with cities to ensure everyone can get a reliable ride at the tap of a button.”

Gig Economy

The question of whether Uber is a transport service has long vexed regulators and lawmakers across Europe. Uber has faced roadblocks, real and regulatory, in the region, amid complaints brought by taxi drivers who say the company tries to unfairly avoid regulations that bind established competitors.

Start ups argue that their apps offer flexible hours to workers. Regulators, governments and unions allege that companies are profiting on the backs of people without benefits such as overtime pay or vacation time.

Without the pressure from regulators, companies in the gig economy will force rivals to employ similarly aggressive tactics, said Andrew Taylor, who earlier this year was commissioned by U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May to come up with recommendations to regulate the new business types.

“There’s a danger of a race to the bottom,” Taylor said. “Major American companies are treating national norms, culture, regulators and tax systems in a cavalier way.”

Status Quo

Mark Graham, professor at the Oxford Internet Institute, said the scrutiny represents a shift against companies that have avoided regulations facing more traditional businesses in the markets they are trying to disrupt by classifying themselves as technology platforms.

Uber isn’t the only business model being questioned by policymakers. In Paris, regulators are clamping down on Airbnb, whose home-rental service has drawn complaints from hotels that are subject to a different batch of rules. Deliveroo, the food-delivery service, is also facing scrutiny over its treatment of workers in the U.K. and elsewhere.

The EU court’s decisions in this and a pending case may bring clarity for Uber’s continuing battles in national courts. London has become a lighting rod for all of the company’s problems. The car-service provider is fighting regulators and drivers in court as it tries to protect its hold on its busiest market outside of the US.

London’s transport regulator banned Uber in September, citing safety concerns, and an appeal will be heard as soon as April. Two drivers successfully sued the company over vacation and overtime in a suit that would force Uber to radically change the way it treats its drivers.

The case is: C-434/15, Asociacion Profesional Elite Taxi.

— With assistance by Jeremy Hodges

[“Source-bloomberg”]

As Banks Crack Down On Crypto Companies, This Lithuanian Payments Startup Is Booming

Trakai Island Castle, near Vilnius the capital of Lithuania. Credit: Shutterstock.

Banks including Barclays and Bank of America have taken a hardline when it comes to companies in the cryptocurrency sector.

Bank elsewhere is their message.

Last year hundreds of businesses operating crypto marketplaces, exchanges and trading platforms found their accounts suspended or shut down as banks were unable to vet their cash through standard anti-money laundering procedures.

Even India’s Central Bank has announced it will no longer deal with customers dealing in cryptocurrencies, because of the risks involved.

But elsewhere, banks that back crypto are booming.

Banking elsewhere

In Gibraltar, Poland, Bulgaria, Liechtenstein and Lithuania, the crackdown on crypto has been big news for their more liberal banking landscapes.

One Lithuanian payments provider, Mistertango, this morning revealed a 1,300% year-on-year growth in transactions it handles for client businesses.

Mistertango reported transactions of €1.2 billion ($1.4 billion) on its platform last year, up from €89 million ($103.3 million) in 2016/17.

Credit: Mistertango.

Audrius Ramanauskas, founder of Mistertango.

CEO Audrius Ramanauskas told Forbes that the vast increase was the result of 1,000 crypto marketplace businesses like Coingate, Quoinex and Coinfalcon which had signed up to the service to handle their fiat payments over the last 12 months.

“The last year or so has seen a flurry of banks in the U.S. and the U.K. rushing to ban crypto-related activity for businesses and individuals,” Ramanauskas explained.

Not only is this an overreaction to the potential risks but these banks could indeed be leaving money on the table. The big problem here is a lack of understanding.”

Despite the fears in the mainstream banking sector, Ramanauskas insisted that his company has “exhaustive” KYC (know your customer) and AML (anti-money laundering) checks on all its customers which comply with all of Lithuania’s laws.

Meanwhile, in Gibraltar, the government is in the final stages of passing the world’s first regulations for initial coin offerings, and in Liechtenstein the royal family has been so welcoming to blockchain businesses that companies like Aeternity are flocking to the principality.

“They’re making it really easy to incorporate a cryptocurrency business,” Yanislav Malahov, founder of Aeternity told Forbes earlier this summer.

You can open a company without a bank account, just by using Bitcoin or Ethereum.”

In Ramanauskas’s view, it’s these forward-thinking countries which are set to soar as crypto goes mainstream.

“Acceptance of crypto is not so much a matter of ‘if’ as it is ‘when’. The rise of blockchain technology and the prevalence of cryptocurrency won’t be stifled. It’s the fastest banks and fintechs that will win.”

[“Source-forbes”]